‘Payment submitted’ – spam and phishing emails

Phishing emails with ‘Payment submitted’  in the subject line similar to those below are doing the rounds – please beware

spam emailIf you think you have received a phishing email

  • DON’T click on any links
    DON’T open any attachments
  • forward the email to abuse@hw.ac.uk
  • delete it

Exam Top Tip: Try the Pomodoro technique.

It is a simple but very effective method that can improve your focus and aid concentration. So to get started you just need a timer-it could be an electronic timer on your phone or lap-top. It doesn’t have to be the old-fashioned kitchen timer shaped like a tomato – but that is where the name originates. Pomodoro is the Italian for tomato. Set the timer for your next study session. Fifty minutes is ideal to start with. After fifty minutes give yourself a ten minute break. Time for a cup of tea or a walk in the fresh air. Then follow with another uninterrupted fifty minute study period. If this method works for you, then start allocating specific topics to revise for each concentrated Pomodoro session. You may be surprised how much revision you can cover using this method.

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Music & Revision

Exam Top Tip: Music & Revision.  You might think these two just don’t mix.  Music can distract.   But conversely it can also help you concentrate and focus – so it is well worth trying it out.  But keep your headphones on if you are studying in the library!  Not everyone will share your musical tastes and some students prefer silence for study.  Here’s an offering from Classic FM for your next study session http://www.classicfm.com/discover-music/mood/studying/classic-fm-revision/.

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Exam Top Tip: Take care of yourself.

Your academic work actually benefits if you build in rest, exercise and relaxation. Your brain needs a good night’s sleep and this is particularly important before the day of your exam.  Exercise will help you relax, keep a good appetite and give you that vital “switch off” time from study.  Remember to build some leisure and relaxation into your study schedule.  This is time to spend with friends or family, go for a walk or watch a TV show.  Finally, don’t forget to eat!  Just as the brain needs sleep it also needs nourishment. spiced_orange_and_honey_36705_16x9

Exam Top Tip: Mix it up!

Successful revision tests your understanding of content. So try recording your answer to a test question and critically listen back.  Is your explanation clear and precise?  Look at a test question and write an essay plan to show how you would answer the question.  If you are a visual learner draw a mind map to show how you would tackle the question.  Mind maps can help you see correlations and identify missing bits of the jigsaw.  All of these methods will help you identify gaps in your knowledge and show you where you need to concentrate most.

Exam Top Tip: Don’t fall into the procrastination trap!

You could use a timetable to mark out revision times for each subject and then stick to it.  Another great way to stop procrastinating and get started is to use the Pomodoro technique: this is as simple as setting a timer.  For example, set your timer for 50 minutes.  This should be concentrated study time – no distractions.  At the end of 50 minutes you have earned yourself a 10 minute break – time for a quick walk or a cup of tea.  Then go for another 50 minutes of concentrated study.  Remember to make your goals for each day realistic, and reward yourself for achieving them. You’ve earnt it!

Exam Top Tip: You don’t have to be anti-social to revise well

Form a study group or find yourself a “study buddy”.  Research shows that group study can be very effective – make use of past examination questions and test each other.  Everyone benefits-but the student whose turn it is to explain the problem, concept or theorem benefits most of all.  Because to explain something means you truly have to understand it. If you don’t have anyone on your course, explain it to a family member or friend.

IT Service Upgrades – Office 365 and VPN

IT Service upgrades

Changes to IEEE referencing style

IEEE have revised their referencing style.  The updated style can be found on our subject guides at https://isguides.hw.ac.uk/ld.php?content_id=31489650

The key difference is when you use et al.  IEEE uses et al. in reference lists when items have many authors: you should now use et al. if an item has six or more authors (rather than three or more.)

The updated style also includes instructions on how to reference more types of online resources, including eBooks, journal articles and conference proceedings.

Happy New Year 2018!

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All our campus libraries are closed today.

See Library opening hours  for details of when each library opens again.

Look forward to seeing you again after the holidays.